SURVEY - Click here  to participate (3 Questions) Would you be interested in having a light-weight, carbon fiber coil, larger than 15 inch size for another brand of metal detector?   Carbon Fibre is considerably lighter, enabling larger sizes which achieves far deeper ground penetration, resulting in use with more comfort and ease.   
Please fill in our survey and we may be manufacturing the coils you suggest.
EXCLUSIVE SNEAK PEAK! NEW FOR 2019: Nexus Pathfinder Twin Box breaks depth penetration records
The Nexus Pathfinder is a brand new additon to our metal detector range.  The two box metal detector redefines the terms depth and discrimination completely.  The mechanical construction of the new Nexus Pathfinder is made out of over 300 individual components forming a complex frame designed to achieve extreme mechanical stability and very low weight at the same time. The weight of the frame and coils of Nexus Pathfinder is only 3 kg. The coils are 75 cm (30') in diameter and the total working length is 185 cm. More information regarding the development of this two box metal detector as well as detailed video tests will be published as soon as it becomes available.
Large carbon fiber search coils for Standard MP and other metal detector brands
An astonishing treasure of 19 Roman clay pots loaded to the brim with bronze and silver coated coins dating approximately back to the late 3rd century was discovered in Seville, Spain.  It lay buried 3 feet under the ground, covered by bricks and pieces of shattered ceramic. The total weight of the coins is 600 kilograms (1,300 pounds). The find is unique due to it's size and features.  Only some of the coins have been examined so far, and they are minted during the reign of emperors Maximian (r. 286-305) and Constantine (r. 306-337).  It seems that they were not in use, as they contain no signs of it. Nine of the clay pots were extracted in well-intact condition. The pots were made to be very strong and sturdy, this way protecting the content very well.  All the pots were identified to be designed for the purpose to carry cash, their shape is different and they are smaller than those used for the purpose of holding food items for various uses. There are two possible options for why the pots were buried there.  It may have been due to social unrest or it could have been a dedicated deposit space inside a military base or fort.  Further search and discovery around the area may reveal more. Whatever the reason could have been, there is certainty that it was not a privately owned treasure as the the content of the pots  are uniform and in uncirculated condition. Two possible options are that it was meant as payment to millitary personal or civil servants or it may have been due for delivery to the tax coffers.
Astonishing treasure of 19 Roman clay pots filled with coins discovered in Spain 
Exceptionally rare gold coin worth 100k found in pristine condition A metal detector enthusiast made the discovery of a lifetime while searching on a freshly ploughed farm field near a historical Roman road in Dover, Kent.  As the 30-year-old detectorist removed the dirt from the shiny find, his initial reaction was that it must be a fake, as it was in absolute pristine condition. Following authentication by the British Museum, it was confirmed that he found an exceptionally rare 24 carat Aureus coin, embellished with the face of Emperor Allectu who reigned during 293 AD, which dates it back to almost 2000 years ago. The finder said 'At first I was quite sceptical of its authenticity because it was so shiny but when I realised what it could be potentially I just completely freaked out by it.' The coin is aproximately the size of a modern one penny and weighs 4.31 grams. Displayed on one side is the head of Allectus and on the other, that of two captives kneeling at the feet of Apollo. The only other known specimen of this coin in in the world is currently displayed at the British Museum. None of them have been found in the past 50 years. Due to it's rarityand perfectly preserved condition, it is believed to sell for £100,000 ($130,000)
when it goes on auction. Britain's Treasure Act states that a single gold coin is not considered a treasure, therefore it is not required to notify the coroner and may be placed on auction.
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EXCLUSIVE SNEAK PEAK! NEW FOR 2019: Nexus Pathfinder Twin Box breaks depth penetration records
SURVEY - Click here to participate (3 Questions) Would you be interested in having a light-weight, carbon fiber coil, larger than 15 inch size for another brand of metal detector?   Carbon Fibre is considerably lighter, enabling larger sizes which achieves 
Please fill in our survey and we may be manufacturing the coils you suggest.
far deeper ground penetration, resulting in use with more comfort and ease.
The Nexus Pathfinder is a brand new additon to our metal detector range.  The two box metal detector redefines the terms depth and discrimination completely.  The mechanical construction of the new Nexus Pathfinder two box detector is made out of over 300 individual components forming a complex frame designed to achieve extreme mechanical stability and very low weight at the same time. The weight of the frame and coils of Nexus Pathfinder is only 3 kg. The coils are 75 cm (30') in diameter and the total working length is 185 cm. More information coming soon including detailed demonstration videos.
An astonishing treasure of 19 Roman clay pots loaded to the brim with bronze and silver coated coins dating approximately back to the late 3rd century was discovered in Seville, Spain.  It lay buried 3 feet under the ground, covered by bricks and pieces of shattered ceramic. The total weight of the coins is 600 kilograms (1,300 pounds). The find is unique due to it's size and features. Only some of the coins have been examined so far, and they are minted during the reign of emperors Maximian (r. 286-305) and Constantine (r. 306-337).  It seems that they were not in use, as they contain no signs of it. Nine of the clay pots were extracted in well-intact condition. The pots were made to be very strong and sturdy, this way protecting the content very well. All the pots were identified to be designed for the purpose to carry cash, their shape is different and they are smaller than those used for the purpose of holding food items for various uses. There are two possible options for why the pots were buried there.  It may have been due to social unrest or it could have been a dedicated deposit space inside a military base or fort.  Further search and discovery around the area may reveal more. Whatever the reason could have been, there is certainty that it was not a privately owned treasure as the the content of the pots are uniform and in uncirculated condition. Two possible options are that it was meant as payment to millitary personal or civil servants or it may have been due for delivery to the tax coffers.
TREASURES IN THE NEWS Astonishing treasure of 19 Roman clay pots filled with coins discovered in Spain 
Aftermarket carbon fiber coils for other brands of metal detetors
Exceptionally rare gold coin worth 100k found in pristine condition A metal detector enthusiast made the discovery of a lifetime while searching on a freshly ploughed farm field near a historical Roman road in Dover, Kent.  As the 30-year-old detectorist removed the dirt from the shiny find, his initial reaction was that it must be a fake, as it was in absolute pristine condition. Following authentication by the British Museum, it was confirmed that he found an exceptionally rare 24 carat Aureus coin, embellished with the face of Emperor Allectu who reigned during 293 AD, which dates it back to almost 2000 years ago. The finder said 'At first I was quite sceptical of its authenticity because it was so shiny but when I realised what it could be potentially I just completely freaked out by it.' The coin is aproximately the size of a modern one penny and weighs 4.31 grams. Displayed on one side is the head of Allectus and on the other, that of two captives kneeling at the feet of Apollo. The only other known specimen of this coin in in the world is currently displayed at the British Museum. None of them have been found in the past 50 years. Due to it's rarity and perfectly preserved condition, it is believed to sell for £100,000 ($130,000) when it goes on auction. Britain's Treasure Act states that a single gold coin is not considered a treasure, therefore it is not required to notify the coroner and may be placed on auction.
Home
Web Statistics
© Nexus Group Ltd.